Minimalism is simple.

Minimalism describes movements in various forms of art and design, especially visual art and music, where the work is set out to expose the essence, essentials or identity of a subject through eliminating all non-essential forms, features or concepts.

We are not talking here about simple living or minimalist lifestyle. Instead we will focus in a movement that supossed a turning point in the history of modernism. Minimal art introduced a new way of producing, looking at and experiencing artworks in the manner of a proper avant-garde.

Breaking away from the excessively expressive Abstract Expressionism, this art discipline stripped its artworks of any form of meaningful, symbolic, emotional and personal content and began exploring the essence and substance of things. This artworks did not refer to anything other than itself, which is exactly what these artists wanted to portray in the first place. Their geometric abstraction for example did not describe anything, neither the external world nor the narrative of a story.

The Minimalist philosophy, as we could see, glorifies a style in which it all comes down to its simplest, most necessary elements. As such, it was widely accepted in the fields of art, architecture and design which were more than willing to explore, interpret and apply the dynamics of clean elements. The goal was to reduce the subject to essentials that were all functional, thus creating void spaces and a sense of freedom, in a way was a reminiscent of Zen Buddhism which instills a desire for a kind of candidness, truthfulness and sincerity.

To end this brief post let´s have a look at this minimalistic comic by Grant Snyder inspired by paintings from minimal artist Ellsworth Kelly and Sol LeWitt. Enjoy!

*(Picture:, Thecounterpress & Incidental Comics).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s